Stanford On The Moon

Interdepartmental Lunar Network

NASA Ames at Stanford
Gregory T.A. Kovacs
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Medicine
Room CISX-202, Paul Allen Building
Stanford, CA 94305-4075
kovacs@cis.stanford.edu

Development of biological space payloads, human (medical) physiologic monitors for spaceflight, and miniaturized instrumentation for extreme environments.
Antonio J. Ricco, Ph.D.
(on assignment from Stanford University)
NASA Ames Research Center
Small Spacecraft Division
ajricco@stanford.edu
At Stanford and NASA, development of remote, autonomous miniaturized analytical systems for fundamental space studies, particularly of living organisms; at Dublin City University, development of next-generation integrated point-of-care medical diagnostic devices.
School of Engineering

Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics

Daniel B. DeBra
Edward C. Wells Professor Emeritus
Department of Aero and Astro
277 Durand mc 4035
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4035
ddebra@stanford.edu

Research Interests: Professor DeBra is involved with robotic space research. He collaborates with Stanford physicists on three projects: Gravity Probe-B (GP-B), Space Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP), and the vibration isolation of a gravity-wave antenna. These involve satellite control of attitude and translation and the development of instruments of extraordinary precision and accuracy.
Bob Twiggs
Space Systems Development Laboratory (SSDL)
Department of Aero and Astro
Durand 271
Stanford University
496 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305
Bob.Twiggs@Stanford.edu

Research Interests: Professor Twiggs' main interest is in the development, launch and operation of small low-cost satellites for space applications feasibility demonstrations and the space qualification of new spacecraft components. He is also involved in the development of low-cost satellite communications for command, control and data acquisition at remote earth locations, and in the miniaturization development of space experiments for low-cost spacecraft missions.
Department of Electrical Engineering
Ronald N. Bracewell

Research in image construction, fast algorithms and solar physics, and more specifically computerized x-ray tomography, radio astronomy, astronomical imaging, antennas, large moving structures, Fourier analysis, image and reconstruction, and Hartley transform. The “Friends of Bracewell” attempted to halt the demolition of five 60’ antenna dishes built by Professor Bracewell and utilized for eleven years to produce the first automatically printed daily solar weather maps, as well as in support of the first human Moon landing.
Umran S. Inan
Professor of Electrical Engineering
Packard Bldg #355
Stanford, CA 94305-9515
Inan@ee.stanford.edu

Research in ionospheric and magnetospheric physics, VLF/LF remote sensing, lightning research, wave-particle interactions, radiation belt dynamics, and applied electromagnetics, especially ionospheric and magnetospheric physics, lightning discharges, wave propagation and scattering, FLV/LF remote sensing, satellite observations of plasma waves, dynamics of the radiation belts, wave-particle interactions, planetary plasma waves, and active wave-injection experiments.
Bruce Lusignan
Associate Professor
Department of Electrical Engineering
Packard Building, Room 237
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305
lusignan@ee.stanford.edu

Research Interests: Director, Communications Satellite Planning Center, and Center for International Cooperation in Space Communications Networks, Ground Station Engineering, and Digital and Photonic Switch Design. Professor Lusignan designs and introduces advanced communications and space systems, including satellite television stations, low cost two-way voice stations, and high data-rate stations. He directs an international planning effort for cooperative exploration of Mars. He directs a weekly seminar on war and peace, trade and environment, and poverty and prejudice. Professor Lusignan is teaching a course on Lunar Utilization in 2005.

Madihally (Sim) Narasimha
Consulting Professor of Electrical Engineering
Space, Telecommunications,
and Radioscience Laboratory (STAR Lab)
350 Serra Mall, David Packard #321
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305
sim@nova.stanford.edu

Research Interests: Signal processing in telecommunications systems, with current research in the development of 1 Gbps and 10 Gbps transceiver ships for twisted pair communications.
Dick Simpson
Research Associate
350 Serra Mall, David Packard #332
Stanford, CA 94305-9515
rsimpson@magellan.stanford.edu
Research Interests: Active radio probing of the solar system with special emphasis on planetary surfaces, their scattering properties, and what may be learned about their composition and texture from such measurements. Present work is focused primarily on Mars, but have been involved intermittently in the search for water ice on the Moon over the past decade.
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Mark A. Cappelli
Associate Professor, Thermosciences Division
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Building 520 -- Room 520J
Stanford, CA 94305-3032
cap@stanford.edu

Research Interests: Plasma Spectroscopy, Plasma Propulsion, Plasma and Combustion Synthesis of Materials. He is currently a member of the Editorial Board of Diamond Films and Technology. He is also secretary of the Electric Propulsion Technical Committee of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics.
Christopher Jacobs
Associate Professor (Research) of
Mechanical Engineering and
Of Orthopedic Surgery
Durand, 233 BME
Stanford, CA 94305-4038
Christopher.Jacobs@stanford.edu

Research in the area of bone loss in microgravity and specifically how cells in bone sense and respond to mechanical loading.
School of Humanities and Sciences
Department of Physics
Vahe Petrosian
Professor of Physics and Applied Physics
Room 302c, Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Stanford, CA 94305-4060
vahe@astronomy.stanford.edu

Research Interests: Theoretical astrophysics with concentration on high energy astrophysical processes in solar and stellar flares, gamma-ray bursts, accretion disks of stellar and active galactic black holes and clusters of galaxies, and in cosmology; early phase of the universe, the evolution of galaxies and quasars, arcs in clusters of galaxies, and gravitational lensing.

Philip H. Scherrer
Professor
Hansen Experimental Physics Lab
455 Via Palou
Stanford, CA 94305-4085
pscherrer@solar.stanford.edu

Research Interests: Detection and prediction of solar variability and the effect of solar variability on the space environment.
School of Medicine
Daniel Kraft, MD
Hematology/Oncology/BMT
Beckman Center, B-265
Stanford, CA 94305
daniel.kraft@stanford.edu

Research Interests: Space Life Sciences
 
 

 

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